“Change Every Room Right Now!” Controlling The Desire For Different

Do you ever have moments where you wake up, look at a room in your house – a perfectly nice room that yesterday you had no problem with whatsoever – and suddenly despise it? All you can see are its flaws, its tired decor, the desperate need for a refresh. The urge to do something about it becomes overpowering.

Perhaps it’s literally the first thing you see of that changeable morning; the bedroom. It’s crying out for a new rug, a change of paint, perhaps even a feature wall you have been daydreaming about. Or perhaps the need for change hits you as the enter the kitchen for your morning coffee; the kitchen is the one that needs the fix. You lust for new taps like those you saw showcased on http://www.tapwarehouse.com/category/kitchen-taps or a hanging pan set that will give you that perfect rustic charm. Or is it the bathroom where your frenzied desire for something different will take shape?

pexels-photo-210604

Or… worst of all: is it everywhere?

It happens. No longer is your desire for something different and a serious decor update grabbing a hold of you, it’s not even bothering to focus. You want every room in the entire house to have at least some small scale change done to it – so what’s your next step?

Option 1: Pick A Room and Change Everything

Focusing on which room is bothering you the most is a good way to begin. You’ve got a strong chance of narrowing down the thirst for difference if you think which area is bothering you the most. If the answer doesn’t naturally come to mind, then think along the lines of which rooms you use the most – and thus will stand the greatest chance to bear the fruits of your renovating labour.

Positives: This focuses you on what you actually want done and gives you a starting point. While the other areas may continue to annoy you, you can at least quiet the protesting voice with the fact you are doing something.

This approach also means you can get into the minute details that, if you try to do everything at once, you might neglect. That’s the little things like:

  • Bedroom: having the time to focus on the practical side of getting up in the morning and how you can make it easier with design choices.
  • Kitchen: this gives you the chance to look through the possibilities of repainting your kitchen cupboards or replacing them. If you’re trying to do everything in one go, you might not slow down to think through your options and will instead just plough through with whatever is quickest.

 

Negatives: It can feel like you’re not getting enough done and are focusing too much on one area. This idea also relies on the fact you can settle on one room to prioritise – which is sometimes easier said than done.

Option 2: Choose One Thing You Hate About Every Room – And Fix That

Start by writing out a list of the rooms you want to change. As an example:

  • Bedroom
  • Kitchen
  • Bathroom

Then sit and think about what you dislike the most about each room. Keep this as simple as possible. For example, this is how not to do it:

  • Bedroom – need a new bed, bedding, and to switch the rug under the new bed.
  • Kitchen – want to refresh wall colour, hang new wall art, and hang a knife rack
  • Bathroom – replace the toilet and retile the floor

You can easily convince yourself that these are all the same problem, because they relate to one another in an indirect way. But this is just going to cause more confusion, so these plans need trimming even further. So, the above becomes:

  • Bedroom – buy a new bed
  • Kitchen – repaint the walls
  • Bathroom – replace the toilet

The rest can be added on later. This option takes the one thing that is bothering you the most and gives you a way to rectify it. The benefit of doing this is that, once complete, you can move onto the next room – so you’re going to be making more progress through the whole house. This approach also works well if you rent your home and need to check each development with your landlord.

And if you’re worrying about the loose ends on the first list, then you can easily assemble a second run through that catches all of them.

Positives: You’ll feel like you’re making real progress. It also gives you a chance to get rid of the things that are bothering you the most, so that’s one less thing to irritate you!

Negatives: It might take a few run throughs of the same system for you to feel like you’re really making a big change to your decor.

Option 3: The Extreme Option

Burst into tears, sell the house, and go and live in a log cabin that doesn’t need renovating. Ever.

Positives: Log cabins are so picturesque.

Negatives: Literally everything else about this idea.

Option 4: Everything At Once

Some of us don’t like to streamline the way we do things, choosing a hotchpotch of plans and doing what we want when we feel like it. Doing things this way might not be the most efficient, but sometimes home design and decor shouldn’t be efficient. Instead, you can let your creative juices flow and go where each space of free time you have takes you.

Positives: The more freespirited approach can be quite liberating. You can switch around and play with ideas, always happy to be doing the chosen task on a chosen day. No one likes to be dictated to about what we should be doing and when – even if you’re the dictator in question!

Negatives: Inevitably, this approach takes longer and can create a lot more mess in your home. However, if you think you can live with that while controlling the urge to procrastinate, then there’s nothing wrong with taking things at your leisure.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: